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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
. a broader calm return. pete: is the u.s. still the key to stopping the violence? at home, posturing and positioning over the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> would you subpoena a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? is that something that's acceptable? >> no. pete: and a candid assessment of the stakes from one of the g.o.p.'s rising stars. >> the fiscal cliff is a creation of the political branch in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories.
a short- run compromise that will get us past the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: the president made his suggestion for a short-term deal. he urged congress to extend tax breaks for the middle class while they work out a bigger plan for a grand bargain. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: while investors remain focused on the fiscal cliff, a further jump in consumer sentiment helped stocks close in the green today. the university of michigan reuters consumer sentiment index this month rose to 84.9. that's its highest level since july of 2007. the dow added four points, the nasdaq was up nine, the s&p 500 added two points. for the week overall, the dow fell 2.1%. the nasdaq dropped 2.6%. and the s&p 500 is 2.4% lower tonight compared to a week ago. >> reporter: while president obama and house speaker boehner both say they're open to new ideas, wall streeters remain cautious about the fiscal cliff. meridien equity partners' joe greco says the market doesn't expect it to be resolved this year. >> i think we're going to see a push pull back and forth and we're probably not going to se
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that figh
for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new
with lawmakers today joins us. he is david cote, c.e.o. of honeywell. david, thank you so much for joining us. we really appreciate it. did you get the sense from house speaker boehner, he is ready to make a deal? >> i would say there is a recognition on all sides about the significance and importance of a deal. it is a real question about getting both sides en the room to actually hammer it out and get something done because we don't have a lot of time left. >> susie: president obama said he would like to have a deal by christmas. from what you heard today, how realistic is that? >> if they want to, they can get this done in a couple of days. it is just a matter of kind of working out some of these important details. but it's a matter, i think, they just need to get together and get started. i think both recognize the need for a market-credible $4 trillion deal, and it has got to comprise both tax increases that are believable and that will happen, and entitlement reform that is believable and will happen. both of those things will have to be an important part of this. >> susie: did speaker boeh
? >> they had multiple paths to get to 270. they used almost all of them. they were able to through very focused data-driven ground operation identify their voters and successfully reassemble the coalition that they had in 2008. african americans, latino, -- latinos, young voters, women. would young voters turn out in the numbers they did before? in fact, they were by one point a higher percentage than they were in 2008. would african americans vote with the same enthusiasm compared to 2008? they did. it was 15%. this was a campaign that set its sights early and improving on what everybody thought was a very good ground operation and they exceeded it. gwen: in a very specific way, not in a broad base at all and not in a way that was out to persuade anyone who had not voted for them before. >> it was not much of a persuasion. they started with the baseline of the 2008 results. and then they had the census from 2010. they saw what had changed and who had moved around. and then it's the sole reason that jim mussina moved to chicago and started building this thing. it became obama for america. they
term, "tampa socialite." general allen is in charge of the fate of 82,000 u.s. troops. ofi don't know the content those are, how many came from him, i don't know those things but we don't know the nature of that relationship. quite a different relationship between allen and joe kelly and petraeus and broadwell -- and jill kelley and petraeus and broadwell. >> why didn't the justice department tell the white house what was going on? >> if they had, we would be screaming cover-up at the white house. damned if you do, damned if you don't. one of the things that griffin bell and sisson, is that he be told when high-level people were under investigation but not tell the president. it would compromise the investigation -- >> there was an election going on. >> there was, and i agree with nina. you have to be careful that you don't put yourself in the position of the cover-up. what is conduct that is worthy of blackmail? the director of national intelligence, what we all say it is. petraeus could be blackmailed by it and fired by it -- >> the fbi agent thought he was doing his duty. >> he is
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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